Brown Scapular

Best Brown Scapular

arite an article onBrown Scapular The Brown Scapular, according to the Carmelite Rule and the traditional teaching of the Church, is that part of the Carmelite habit which hangs down from the neck over the breast, in front and behind, and consists of two strips of brown woolen cloth connected by strings or ribbons. The Carmelite Rule, which was approved by Pope Innocent IV in 1247 and is therefore of Apostolic origin, enjoins the Carmelites to wear the scapularhumble and without show as a badge of their order and a sign of their consecration to Mary, the Mother of God. The scapular is thus essentially a Marian devotion, and has always been associated with special graces and privileges in connection with the Blessed Virgin. The history of the scapular, as far as we can trace it, begins in the thirteenth century. In the year 1251, St. Simon Stock, the then Superior General of the Carmelites, was in Rome on a visit to Pope Innocent IV. During his stay in the Eternal City the pope is said to have had a vision in which the Blessed Virgin appeared to him holding the scapular in her hand and saying:Receive, my beloved son, this scapular of thy Order as a badge of my confraternity and a sign of salvation, whosoever dies clothed in this habit shall not suffer everlasting fire. It is the will of the Most High that those who are devoted to me should wear this scapular. He who dies in this garment, or even with it on his heart, shall not be condemned.” The pope, in consequence of this vision, not only approved of the scapular as a part of the Carmelite habit, but is said to have given St. Simon a large supply of the scapulars for the use of his Order. The scapular soon became very popular, and in the course of time other religious orders adopted it as part of their own habit. The Dominicans, for instance, wear a white scapular, and the Augustinians a black one. The great popularity which the scapular has always enjoyed is due to the many and great indulgences and privileges which the Church has attached to it. The scapular is thus, in a certain sense, a sacramental, and, like all other sacramentals, it is a means of grace which God has appointed for our sanctification. The scapular is, in the first place, a badge of membership in the Confraternity of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. In order to become members of this Confraternity it is necessary to be enrolled by a priest, who at the same time bestows upon the candidates the scapular.

The enrollment is a simple ceremony, which consists in the recitation of certain prayers and the imposition of the scapular on the head and shoulders of the candidates by the priest. The enrollment in the Confraternity of Our Lady of Mount Carmel confers upon the members a number of spiritual benefits, the chief of which are:

1. The privilege of being under the special protection of the Blessed Virgin.

2. The right to have the prayers of the whole Carmelite Order said for them.

3. The spiritual assistance of the Carmelite Fathers in case of sickness or death.

4. The indulgences and privileges which are attached to the scapular.

The scapular is thus a most powerful means of grace, and has always been considered by the Church as a very efficacious means of obtaining God’s blessing and protection. The scapular is, in the third place, a sacramental which has always been associated with a number of very special graces and privileges. The most famous of these is the so-called “Scapular Promise,” which is as follows: “Whosoever dies clothed in this habit shall not suffer everlasting fire.” This promise, which is of very ancient origin, has always been considered by the Church as a most efficacious means of obtaining God’s blessing and protection. The scapular is, in the fourth place, a sacramental which has always been associated with a number of very special indulgences.
The most famous of these is the so-called “Papal Indulgence,” which was granted by Pope Benedict XIV in 1741. This Indulgence, which is still in force, confers upon the wearer the following indulgences:

1. A plenary indulgence on the day of enrollment.

2. A plenary indulgence at the time of death, provided that the scapular is worn constantly and that the wearer is in the habit of saying the prescribed prayers.


3. An indulgence of seven years and seven quarantines for the wearing of the scapular.

4. An indulgence of three years and three quarantines for the saying of the prescribed prayers.

5. An indulgence of one year and forty days for the saying of the Lord’s Prayer and the Hail Mary while the scapular is being put on or taken off.

List of Best Brown Scapular

No products found.

No products found.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.